Courts/Law

ACLU notes from Sacramento…parolee voting rights, police body cameras, etc.

State Assembly votes to restore voting rights to nearly 50,000 Californians on parole The California State Assembly passed Assembly Constitutional Amendment (ACA) 6, which would restore voting rights to nearly 50,000 Californians on parole. ACA 6, authored by Asm. Kevin McCarty (D-Sacramento), passed with a 54-16 vote. ACA 6 will next go through the California State Senate, where it will need a 2/3 majority to…


30 years later, RSF gardener on trial for love

A man who allegedly shot his friend three times in the back over a woman, then fled to Mexico and remained on the lam for three decades, is finally set for trial. Simon Loredo Mayo, 58, faces up to 14 years in prison if convicted of the Dec. 12, 1988, shooting at Luna De Miel in Rancho Santa Fe. Mayo fired at least five times…


One Hunter down, one to go in fraud scandal

Margaret Hunter, a co-defendant in a federal fraud case with her husband Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Vapeville), changed her plea to guilty Thursday at a change of plea hearing in front of U.S. District Court Judge Thomas J. Whelan, at the San Diego courthouse. The couple misused about $250,000 in campaign donations for personal expenses, according to Hunter. In one incident, Rep. Hunter planned on buying a pair of…


Stone Brewing beef froths with Miller Coors

Score one for true independent craft beer today as the #TrueStonevsKeystone lawsuit continues.  On Tuesday, March 26, a San Diego Federal Court judge issued its order regarding Stone’s preliminary injunction motion against one of the world’s largest beer conglomerates, MillerCoors.  It confirmed “Stone’s mark to be commercially strong and recognizable,” deserving of “strong protection.” Miller Coors is infringing on the brewery’s trademark rights, according to…


Newsom’s death penalty hold and the nation

Both celebration – and ire – followed Gov. Gavin Newsom’s announcement of a moratorium on the death penalty in California. California’s 737 death row inmates constitute more than a quarter of the national number. Keeping them on death row costs $150 million a year more than sentencing them to life without parole. California’s death penalty has been at an impasse for decades. The state has…


Revenge nude porn strikes out Jacque Jones

Former San Diego High and Major League Baseball standout, and San Pasqual Valley resident, Jacque Jones discovered a pitch he couldn’t beat when he struck out on a charge of posting revenge nude photos of an ex-girlfriend. Jones was alleged to have distributed multiple photos of the woman following an argument over a sweatshirt. A 12-member jury trial Feb. 19-23 mainly focused on one nude…


‘Round town: Hercules, low gas, and murder

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s at Valley Center History Museum The January birthdate of famed actor-bodybuilder Steve Reeves is being remembered at the Valley Center History Museum which has a collection of the late star’s memorabilia. Known internationally as the winner of every major bodybuilding competition as as the star of “Hercules” and 17 other motion pictures, Reeves is little-known as a rancher…


No-go on Cal drunken driving starting Jan. 1

California, and other states deploy breathalyzers in cars to limit road deaths ’Tis the season to be a little too merry, and law enforcement officials across the country are once again reminding revelers not to drive if they’ve been drinking. Along with those warnings comes a bit of good news: Deaths involving drunken driving are only about half of what they were in the early…


Cal v. Trump over vehicle emission standards

The Trump administration this summer formally announced a proposal to freeze fuel economy standards and tailpipe emission standards for new cars. In addition, it is proposing to revoke California’s authority to set more stringent rules. This move by the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, while expected for months, is the most significant action yet in rolling back efforts by the…


Cal court gig economy ruling not that broad

A recent California Supreme Court ruling is being hailed as a “game changer” for the gig economy. That’s because the court adopted a more streamlined test for deciding whether a worker is an independent contractor or an employee. Gig economy companies, like Uber and Lyft, overwhelmingly classify their workers as independent contractors. As a result, they don’t comply with basic employment laws, like minimum wage…